New York

The Trauma-Informed Juvenile Justice Program

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021 and 2012-2016]
Description: 

The Trauma-informed Juvenile Justice Program is a Category III (community practice) center of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network based at Bellevue Hospital Center. Funded by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and partnered with the New York Office of Children’s Services (OCS) and the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH), our program focuses on improving the quality of care in juvenile justice facilities in New York City and State and, eventually across the United States.

Youth in the juvenile justice system have very high rates of trauma exposure and, sometimes, this trauma exposure is expressed in the violent behavior for which children were adjudicated. The Trauma-informed Juvenile Justice Program aims to address this serious problem by providing the following to detention facilities in the juvenile justice system:

  • High quality screening tools to identify a child’s trauma history and its impact on his or her functioning. 
  • Training programs for correction officers in detention facilities so that they may be best equipped to help the youth in their facilities. 
  • Intervention programs to address the traumatic stress problems of youth who reside in detention facilities 
  • Consultation programs to help administrators of detention facilities best organize and manage their program to address the needs of traumatized children in their facilities 
  • Legal advocacy programs to educate judges and others in the legal system about the relationship between violent behavior and traumatic stress in some children who commit crimes.

 

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Michael Surko
Phone: 
(929) 888-6795
Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

The Staten Island Mental Health Society, Inc. (SIMHS) is a private, not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) children’s services agency serving Staten Islanders since 1895. The mission of the Staten Island Mental Health Society is to improve the quality of life for Staten Island children and their families. Our vision is to have affordable, high quality, and evidence-based mental health, chemical dependence and related services readily available for Staten Island children. While specializing in the treatment of mental health related problems, developmental disabilities, and chemical dependence, it is also a respected, well established provider of effective services to disconnected and at-risk youth and adolescents transitioning to adulthood. The Society provides services to children and adolescents and their families who have been exposed to trauma including sexual or physical abuse, witness of domestic violence, school and community violence, and natural disasters. The focus of our NCTSN grant work is to expand, and enhance our continuum of evidence based trauma care to better serve children affected by an array of compounding traumatic events. SIMHS will utilize TF-CBT, CBITS and psychoeducation resiliency curriculums across our system of care that includes out-patient clinics, school based clinics, Children's Day Treatment Programs, as well as Head Start programs.

City, State: 
Staten Island, NY
Contact: 
Yezenia Ortiz-Perez
Phone: 
(718) 442-2225
Email: 

The Family Peace Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

The Family PEACE (Preventing Early Adverse Childhood Experiences) Trauma Treatment Center (FPTTC) is an outpatient mental health service at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center. The FPTTC provides services to young children and caregivers who have been exposed to traumatic violence and abuse. The FPTTC provides Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) for children ages 0-5 and their caregivers as well as adjunctive individual treatment for caregivers, and Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC) for the 6-10 year-old siblings of 0-5 year-old referred children. The FPTTC additionally provides trainings for community partner organizations on the impact of trauma on young children and for hospital medical staff on how to effectively screen for Intimate Partner Violence within the primary care setting. The current project develops a model co-location program to place Spanish-speaking, trauma and CPP-trained early childhood psychologists into NYP pediatric primary care clinics and community based organizations with the goals of: implementing screening protocols to increase early identification of trauma-exposed children ages 0-5; improving access to developmentally appropriate, linguistically competent, and evidence-based trauma treatment; and developing a trauma-informed system of care through the training of pediatric medical residents, primary care staff, and collaborating community organizations. The project additionally pilots a model of supportive programming that is Spanish-language, culturally informed, and culturally proficient in order to enhance treatment outcomes for bicultural Latino families affected by traumatic events.

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Erica Willheim
Phone: 
(646) 317-5593
Email: 
Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

This center to improve the well-being of youth with Developmental Disabilities (DD) impacted by trauma at LIJ Medical Center of Northwell Health increases DD caregivers' sensitivity to trauma-related needs and increases the availability of clinicians who can provide treatment for this doubly vulnerable population. Strategies include cross-training for developmental disabilities and trauma and development and dissemination of DD-appropriate trauma-related assessment tools and treatment adaptations. The project facilitates dissemination of the recently developed NCTSN toolkit, Road to Recovery, to increase awareness of the effects of trauma on youth with DD and develop additional materials based on the needs assessment. Initial target audiences are agencies specializing in services for children with developmental disabilities and community-based clinical providers; subsequently, this will be expanded to other providers in special education, child welfare, and medical settings; and finally, military/veteran families coping with both service-related issues and developmental disabilities will be included. The center will collaborate with identified partners working to adapt assessment and intervention tools for youth with DD within NCTSN and seek additional partners to create a collaborative group focusing on this population. By the end of the project, the center will have developed a guide to assist in matching type of disability with best available practices and develop a methodology for communities to assess their unique combination of needs and resources to enhance services for the DD youth, their families, and their providers.

City, State: 
New Hyde Park, New York
Contact: 
Peter D'Amico
Phone: 
(718) 470-8352
Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021]
Description: 

Brooklyn Action for Child and Teen Success (Brooklyn-ACTS) is a program of The Family Center focusing on building agency and community capacity to identify and treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children ages 5-18. In collaboration with the CARES Institute, Brooklyn ACTS trains and certifies therapists in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and provides the intervention to children and adolescents residing in some of the most disadvantaged communities in Brooklyn, NY. The program aims to build sustainable capacity within the agency and with our central Brooklyn community partners to increase on-going access to evidenced-based, trauma-focused treatment and services for minority children who experience or witness traumatic events. These severely traumatized children exhibit significant emotional or behavioral difficulties related to one or more traumatic life events, including complex trauma. Clinicians, clinical supervisors, directors, and community partners are trained in TF-CBT, an evidenced-based intervention that effectively treats trauma symptoms in children, adolescents, and their parents. The program also assesses for common barriers to retention in behavioral health services and provides care management to address these barriers. Our integrated approach reflects our philosophy that comprehensive trauma-informed, culturally congruent treatment and person-centered care management helps create meaningful and sustained improvements in mental health and overall functioning. Trauma education and outreach to community partners enhances community partner capacity to identify and refer children whose behavior/symptoms suggest possible traumatic stress.

City, State: 
Brooklyn, NY
Contact: 
Ivy Gamble Cobb
Phone: 
(718) 230-1379

The Safe Mothers Safe Children (SMSC), New York University Lagoon School of Medicine: Child Trauma Institute

Funding Period: 
[2007-2012]
Description: 

The Safe Mothers Safe Children (SMSC) initiative seeks to reduce the risk of repeat child maltreatment through a multi-pronged intervention that enhances the identification, case management, and treatment of mothers receiving preventive services for trauma-related disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. The intervention is designed to treat PTSD and depression and foster positive parenting as a means of reducing child maltreatment and enhancing maternal and child well-being. The treatment is delivered at partner agencies’ sites and consists of 23 sessions. In addition, the SMSC initiative aims to help preventive agencies identify traumatized mothers who are at risk for repeat maltreatment and/or foster care placement; improve access to mental health services for mothers at high risk; increase caseworker knowledge of trauma and its impact on parenting and child maltreatment; increase caseworkers’ knowledge of early childhood needs and resources; develop caseworkers’ engagement skills with traumatized clients; and improve preventive agency practice.

City, State: 
New York, NY
Contact: 
Roni Avinadav
Phone: 
(646) 754-4815

Adelphi University, Institute for Adolescent Trauma Training and Treatment

Funding Period: 
[2016 - 2021 and 2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The Institute for Adolescent Trauma Treatment and Training serves as a training center and resource for the delivery of evidence-based trauma-informed treatment to children and adolescents across the United States, with an emphasis on youth in residential settings, the majority of whom have been affected by complex trauma. Building on groundwork from previous funding cycles, the Institute partners with local and national agencies and service systems to do the following: (1) intensively train multidisciplinary providers to deliver trauma-informed interventions to youth in residential settings across the United States; (2) develop and disseminate multi-media products (e.g., treatment protocols, fact sheets, workshops, webinars, youth-led videos) and specialized resources for youth, families, and providers in various types of residential settings; and (3) promote sustainability of trauma-informed practices through the development of policies, practices, and procedures that will embed trauma services within residential systems on an organizational level.

Training in several leading trauma-specific interventions used in residential settings is offered through ongoing Learning Communities. Training in client-level interventions includes Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS) and Real Life Heroes (RLH). Systems-level training in Think Trauma, and Attachment, Regulation, and Competency (ARC) helps establish a trauma-informed organizational culture and provides foundational support for bringing in the trauma-specific clinical interventions. Also, the Institute develops general and specialized resources for use in various types of residential settings, including intervention adaptations for settings with short-lengths of stay and for specific subpopulations such as unaccompanied refugee minors.

City, State: 
Garden City, NY
Contact: 
Mandy Habib
Phone: 
(516) 877-4356

Lutheran Family Health Centers (LFHC), The School-Based Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center

Funding Period: 
[2012 - 2016]
Description: 

The School-Based Treatment and Services Adaptation (TSA) Center will be created by Lutheran Family Health Centers (LFHC), in collaboration with the New York City Department of Education in southwest Brooklyn, to further develop and validate trauma-informed treatments and services that will serve culturally diverse children and youth, and their families. The goals are to: 1) form a community coalition focused on building capacity to address child and family trauma, particularly within the context of larger child-serving systems including day care, preschools, schools, youth services, and child welfare; 2) build up community and stakeholder consensus and work collaboratively with TSA Centers and the NCCTS; 3) further culturally modify the TEMAS Narrative Therapy-Trauma (TNT-T); 4) develop an outreach component, which will include workshops to train parents, school and community agency personnel, and primary care providers; 5) train mental health staff and pediatric staff throughout the LFHC’s nine primary care centers and 15 school-based health centers; 6) identify, screen, and refer children and adolescents at high risk for traumatic stress; 7) train mental health staff at the Sunset Terrace Mental Health Center and Healthy Connections program; and 8) export training on the implementation of culturally competent, evidence-based TNT-T modalities.
 

City, State: 
Brooklyn, NY
Contact: 
Richard J. Brown
Phone: 
(914) 320-0232
Address: 

1300 Union Turnpike, Suite 304
New Hyde Park, New York 11040

Work: 
(516) 488-3716
Fax: 
(516) 488-3716
Description: 

Dr. Juliet M. Vogel is a former director of training for the Division of Trauma Psychiatry for the North Shore LIJ Health System in Manhasset, New York. Through the NCTSN category II site there, she was involved in the development of programs for children, families, and first responders affected by 9/11, and in the development of a program for military personnel and their families. Her NCTSN workgroup participation has included co-authoring NCTSN’s Psychological First Aid for Schools Field Guide. Dr. Vogel currently teaches the didactic seminar for the Division of Trauma Psychiatry at NSLIJ. She maintains a private practice and does consulting, with a particular interest in family resilience. She is involved in the NCTSN Family Systems, Military Families, and Terrorism and Disaster collaborative groups.

 

Robin F. Goodman, PhD, ATR-BC

Address: 

303 Fifth Ave. Suite 806
New York, NY 10016

Work: 
(212) 388-1599
Description: 

Robin Goodman is Executive Director of A Caring Hand, the Billy Esposito Foundation in New York, New York, and consultant to St. John’s University. As consultant to the Allegheny General Hospital Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents, she focuses on childhood traumatic grief-related activities and NCTSN projects. Dr. Goodman has also been a consultant for the Department of Defense Educational Opportunities Directorate and for the NCTSN. Previously, as director of bereavement programs at the NYU Child Study Center, an NCTSN grantee, she co-directed a clinical and research program for bereaved 9/11 families.
 

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